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 25 Lou - STORIES (Read 832745 times)
LOU
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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1920 - Nov 30th, 2021 at 3:31pm
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Dawn,
Your email brought back a ton of memories.  The nickname came from the fact that the 727's were poor climbers so we called the pigs.  Over time, a bunch of names were applied to every one of the 727 fleet.  I loved the names pilots came up with for the planes.  One of my favorites was: N54348 -231(A) My Hammy Vice.  A few of the pilots got stickers printed and at one time or another you would find a sticker applied to the plane, sometimes right at the entry door.  The newer -231 727's were the really slower climbers.  The -31 & -231 were the numbers that Boeing gave to the TWA planes.  The TWA 707's had a similar # -331, 331B, 331BA etc.

Of the 90 something 727s TWA operated, these are some of the names...

Registration - Type - Name
N12301 -231 Porky's Flagship
N12302 -231 Porky's Petunia
N12303 -231 Hambone
N12304 -231 Porc du Jour
N12305 -231 Picnic Ham
N12306 -231 Heavenly Hambone
N12307 -231 Pigadilly
N12308 -231 Duroc Delight
N52309 -231 Sows About It
N52310 -231 Squealor Pealor
N52311 -231 Spring Chitlin
N52312 -231 Lard Sakes
N52313 -231 Kermit's Desire
N94314 -231 Hampshire Humper
N64315 -231 Hog Lander
N44316 -231 Trough Aloft
N74317 -231 Weiner Winger
N74318 -231 Pigmalion
N64319 -231 Aurora Boarialis
N64320 -231 Lard Above
N64321 -231 Heavenly Hog
N64322 -231 Ham Sweet Ham
N64323 -231 Petulant Porker
N64324 -231 Gilty Lady
N54325 -231 South Dakota Suey
N54326 -231 Me-a-Farrow
N54327 -231 Poland China Diner
N54329 -231 Makin' Bacon
N54330 -231 Short Lardage
N54331 -231 Smokin' Porkin'
N54332 -231 Porky's Palace
N54333 -231 Pig o' my Heart
N54334 -231 Truffle Hunter
N54335 -231 Strato Swine
N54336 -231 Fog Hog
N54337 -231 Oklahoma Oinker
N54338 -231(A) Pickled Pig's Feet
N64339 -231(A) Star Swine of Beirut
N54340 -231(A) Bacon Bomber
N54341 -231(A) Gloria Vandergilt
N54342 -231(A) City of Smithfield
N24343 -231(A) Boaring Soaring
N54344 -231(A) Old Lang Swine
N54345 -231(A) Pork Link Connected
N64346 -231(A) Sue Oui
N64347 -231(A) Road Hog
N54348 -231(A) My Hammy Vice
N54349 -231(A) Sty Stream
N54350 -231(A) Sow Belly
N54351 -231(A) Ozone Oinker
N54352 -231(A) Ham Commander
N54353 -231(A) Poland China Clipper
N54354 -231(A) Millenium Wallflower
N84355 -231(A) Porker Forker
N84356 -231(A) San Juan Sow
N84357 -231(A) Barbados Bristler
N831TW -31 Boeing Oink
N833TW -31 Ham Tram
N839TW -31 Piggy Sue
N840TW -31 Sky Pig
N841TW -31 Thunder Pig
N842TW -31 Porky's Pride
N844TW -31 Pork Chop
N845TW -31 Warped Hog
N846TW -31 Lil' Porky
N847TW -31 Schwine Der Blitzen
N848TW -31 Hog Jaw
N849TW -31 Lard Limo
N850TW -31 Jimmy Dean
N851TW -31 Short Snort
N852TW -31 Queen of the Sty
N853TW -31 Kitty Hog
N854TW -31 Cloud Boarer
N855TW -31 Slow Pork
N856TW -31 Porcine Princess
N857TW -31 Swine Flew
N859TW -31 Gloria DeJavaline
N889TW -31 Celestial Chitlin
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1921 - Dec 7th, 2021 at 2:32pm
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Hi ALL,

Just flew the new CS 767-400 on MSFS...

WOW!  I love it.

Lou
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1922 - Dec 7th, 2021 at 4:19pm
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LOU wrote on Dec 7th, 2021 at 2:32pm:
Hi ALL,

Just flew the new CS 767-400 on MSFS...

WOW!  I love it.

Lou

I think I need to reboot my system, as after selecting the 767-400, MSFS CTD's. Shocked
I'll probably test it later today Oz time (it's 3:17am here now). Grin
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1923 - Feb 20th, 2022 at 8:58pm
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Hello all you simmers,

Hope you are all well and safe.

I was chatting with an old pilot friend and we were talking about minimum equipment for dispatch.  In the flight handbook there was a section called MEL or minimum equipment list.  Every once in a while we would have to consult the list to see if we were legal to fly if some item was not working. 

I remember a flight out of Dallas TX in a 757 one evening....

We arrived at the gate for the last flight from Dallas to New York.  The flight had a full passenger load and the weather was good.  When I arrived in the cockpit the first thing I would look for was the logbook.  In the logbook there was an item that would require looking in the MEL.  The left engine generator was INOP. The 757 has a generator on each engine and the MEL says in order to dispatch you need two sources of electrical power.  Okay, so we will need to run the APU for the entire flight to provide a second power source for the flight.  If the APU were to quit, or the other engine driven generator stopped working then you would have to declare an emergency and land ASAP before the plane would run out of battery power (around 30 minutes at best.

Well, over my flying career I had a few of these situations occur. 

I will digress...  I was flying out of Paris CDG one fine day in a Boeing 767-200.  We had just taken off and were in a turn to join the departure when one of the engine driven generators quit.  Shocked  We were fully loaded with passengers and fuel just to make it even more interesting.  I reached up and started the APU.  If it would not start we would be forced to return to CDG and make an overweight landing.  It started so we would continue with our flight to New York running the APU for the entire trip.

So I return to the Dallas story and our situation with the left generator inop.

Departure time is here so the front door is closed and we prepare to push back from the gate.  I called the fellow driving the push tractor and we release the parking brake.  As we started the push the APU quit and all went dark since we had not yet started the engines. I called the tug driver and told him to stop the push and bring us back to the gate and plug in ground power.  Maintenance was called and the jet-way was put back on the plane. I made a PA announcement to the passengers explaining the situation and that we would be delayed until we could resolve the problem.  A mechanic showed up in the cockpit and we discussed the situation.  He said he thought if he replaced the left generator switch on the overhead panel maybe that could fix the problem with the engine driven generator.  He worked fast and hard to install a new generator control switch.  Now we had to run the engine to see if the fix would work.  Ground air was installed so we could start the engine since the APU was dead.  Well, you guessed it, the switch replacement did not fix the problem so now what do we do?. While the mechanic was working on fixing the switch a mechanic supervisor came to the cockpit and announced he was having the APU temp probes cleaned and was going to sign off the problem with the APU quitting. 

Now by this time in my career, approaching 37 years in the cockpit, I was not happy with this solution to fix the APU.  Sad  I told the supervisor I was born at night, but not last night and argued that the APU needed something more than a cleaning of the temp probes.  He would not listen to me and continued to fill out the log book for dispatch.  Just as he handed me the log book telling me all was fine - wait for it - yes you guessed it... the APU quit again. 

So the epilogue is we ALL left the plane - passengers and crew - and went to the hotel and the next morning with a different plane we completed the trip.

Flying is fun! Grin
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1924 - May 30th, 2022 at 3:06pm
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Hello all you simmers.  Hope you are all well and happy!

I've mentioned this before but one of the fun approaches is the River Visual to RW 19 at KDCA.  I really enjoyed this approach in the B-727, but It's really fun in the B-757 as well.

Use this link to get a PDF of the approach plate: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwi1l6ns...

The approach starts at the 10 mile DME arc of the DCA VOR 111.0.  You basically follow the river for noise abatement as you step down in altitude at the various DMR arcs.  There are some good visual check marks as you fly the approach.  You need to observe the P-56 area about two miles out as you start your final maneuver to line-up with the runway.  It's best to be configured for landing by the Chain Bridge around 6 DME so you can complete the landing checklist and concentrate on the approach and landing.

Give it a try and let me know how you like it.  You can also try the visual approach to RW 13 L&R at KJFK.  Once you feel comfortable with the approach, try adding some weather to make it more of a challenge.

Have fun,
Lou
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1925 - Aug 11th, 2022 at 7:15pm
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Hi Simmers,

I want to relate a short story of flying the Boeing 767.  As a pilot for TWA before American bought us in 2001, we were able to bid to fly both domestic and international flights as our seniority would allow.  Some times I would bid to fly a month of flying to the Caribbean, especially during the winter months.  These trips were not efficient since the flight time for each leg was around 3 hours from my base in New York.  Many of the flights were just one leg to the Caribbean and then layover and fly back either the next day or sometimes we would layover for day in the Caribbean and then fly home on the third day.  So only around 6 hours flight time for three days, but each trip was like a vacation so that made up for the low flight time.

On other months I would bid flight from JFK to Cairo or Tel Aviv which built up a lot of flight time in few days at work.  So I want to tell you about a flight I flew to Cairo in the 767 ER.  The flight over to Cairo from JFK takes around 12 hours depending on the winds.  The flight leaves JFK around 10 P.M. and arrives in Cairo around 4 P.M. local time.  On these long trip we had and extra pilot so we could get a short rest period during the flight.  The westbound trip could take around 15 hours, again depending on the winds.  So this night we were preparing to leave Egypt for the U.S. and the flight time was around 15 hours and the weather in New York was not forecast to be very good.  The weather around our arrival time at 6 A.M. was forecast to be - wind 190v210 30 G 40 ceiling 200 overcast and 1/2 mile viability with rain. There was a large low pressure area moving up along the east coast and with that kind of weather we were hard pressed to find a decent alternate airport that was within our range.

One of the problems with fueling the plane in Cairo is that the fuel was delivered by fuel trucks and not pumped from under ground storage tanks.  Fuel in the ground tanks would be cooler, a lot cooler than fuel in an above ground fuel truck.  The warmer the fuel the less fuel volume you can place in the wing tanks since the fuel expands with temperature.  For this flight we needed all the fuel we could get since the weather was so bad and the available alternates were not that close.  So this evening we asked the fuller to pump as slow as possible to reduce any foaming and thus get as much as we could in the tanks.  After the fueling was complete we calculated we would have just enough to fly to JFK, make one approach and have enough fuel left to fly to the alternate and make an approach or two.

Now I've told you all this detail to relate this approach in JFK to you and show you how interesting the landing was.  We flew as efficiently as we could by flying as high as we could and trying to avoid the head winds as best as we could so we had enough fuel to make the approach in JFK.  We were cleared for the approach and given the weather as: wind 190v200 degrees at 33 gusting to 40 with ceiling of 200 feet and RVR of 1,800 feet.  So after briefing the approach and the missed approach procedure we began the ILS to RW 22L at JFK.  It was pretty bumpy as we slid down the glide slope.  Our VREF was 127 knots and it was raining pretty hard.  As we passed the 500 foot call we were getting bounced around pretty good and as we approached our minimum of 200 feet I was able to see some ground and the approach lights and sequence flashers. I said continue and as the 200 foot minimum call came I saw on the ground speed read out - 88knots! Wow! As I went into the flare I was amazed how slow we were going in relation to the ground.  We touched down and the spoilers deployed and almost immediately the F/O called out 80 knots.  I never even deployed the reverse thrust and hardly even applied any breaking to make the first turnoff.

I was very happy to have been able to make the landing and not have to go to the alternate.

Have fun flying!

Lou
  

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Re: Lou - STORIES
Reply #1926 - Sep 18th, 2022 at 3:39pm
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Hello all you simmers,

In the above story I mentioned that I would bid to fly trips to the Caribbean during the colder months.  The trips were not that efficient for building time for the monthly total, but they were really like vacations each trip since you would stay a full day each trip so it was really like a paid for vacation every time.

This one trip - back in the 1990's I remember had a special ending.  We would leave New York's KJFK and fly down to Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic.  The flight was about 3 hours and we would arrive in the early evening and spend the next day at the beach resort before flying home the next day.  I know, very tough duty!  Grin

Just before we were to fly home to New York, I was watching the news about the scheduled launch of the space shuttle which had been delayed but was now set to takeoff that evening.  We were flight planned along one of the AR (Atlantic Route) airways, well off shore maybe 400 hundred miles off the coast of Florida.  As we were flying north along the AR route at 41,000 on a clear night all of a sudden we could see the glow off in the west of the launch from Florida.  We saw what looked like the boosters separating from the main shuttle.  The shuttle was going almost directly over our flight path and as it passed over us we could see the short bursts from the steering thrusters against the night sky.  That is a flight I will always remember.

If you folks have any questions or comments send them to me here and I'll try to answer them. 

As you may know since I retired from flying, I am an enrichment speaker on Viking Ocean ships where my main job is Viking Resident Astronomer on the two ships that have state-of-the-art planetariums and very high end telescopes that allow me to show passengers the wonders of the night sky.  But as a side line I bring along my Predator lap top with Lockheed Martin's P3D-v5 and Captain Sims Boeing 757.  The ship has a fantastic theater with a wall of high definition 1080p LED's - not a projector - and Dolby surround sound.  During the cruise I take the passengers into the cockpit of the 757 to one of the cities along the cruise route in a real time flight, from cold start, where they see everything a pilot does to fly the plane.  It is really a fantastic scene on a high definition screen 30 X 12 feet.  Passengers have told me they are looking for the seat belts in the theater seats!  The cruise director comes around before the flight and hands out air sickness bags as a joke and some of the staff act as flight attendants before the flight with a safety briefing.  Passengers love it! Cool  I've been doing these presentations on Viking Ocean since 2016 and have been all over the world.

I hope you all are enjoying your flying.  Stay safe!

Lou

  

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